Ian Wong, Brown University

Abstract: Epithelial cells transition between collective and individual migration during development and disease, analogous to interacting building blocks (dis)assembling as an active material. In this seminar, I will present recent results on my group to investigate so-called epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in the context of soft matter physics, mechanobiology, and machine learning. First, we investigate how mammary epithelial cells transition from a fluid-like “unjammed” phase to a solid-like “jammed” phase.

Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength and duration of natural, vaccine-induced immunity

Posted Sep 22, 2020

Princeton researchers, including Chadi Saad-Roy, a Ph.D. candidate in Princeton's Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, report that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the long-term trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19, according to a study published Sept. 21 in the journal Science. In particular, a vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response could substantially reduce the future burden of infection.


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Researchers in the Murphy lab discover how worms pass down knowledge of a pathogen to their offspring

Posted Sep 22, 2020

The microscopic roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans feeds on bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, certain environmental conditions can cause P. aeruginosa to change in such a way that it becomes pathogenic -- that is, it sickens worms that eat it. In 2019, researchers in the Murphy lab showed that when worm mothers are made ill by P. aeruginosa, they learn to avoid the bacterium.


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Kang finds keys to control the ‘driver of cancer’s aggressiveness’

Posted Sep 22, 2020

“Do not erase.” “Recycle me.” “Free to a good home.” Humans post these signs to indicate whether something has value or not, whether it should be disposed of or not. Inside our cells, a sophisticated recycling system uses its own enzymatic signs to flag certain cells for destruction — and a different set of enzymes can remove those flags.


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Seating is #1 COVID risk for fans in stadiums - Futurity

Posted Sep 10, 2020

John E. McCarthy, professor of mathematics and chair of the mathematics and statistics department at Washington University in St. Louis, helped develop a mathematical model that assesses the risk of attending a public sporting event compared with other high-traffic events, such as traveling through airports and flying; attending a class or church service; or going to the grocery store.

Click here for full story, by Leslie McCarthy-WUSTL


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Chirag Kumar '23

Why did you enroll in ISC?

As someone who is interested in all aspects of science and loves using techniques across disciplines, ISC seemed like the perfect fit for me! Moreover, previous ISC students told me that ISC taught them how to attack any scientific question and gave them a great group of friends. They told me that the ISC curriculum was truly one-of-a-kind – both in terms of lectures and labs – and prepared them for just about anything It seemed like the perfect class!

Bhoomika Chowdhary '23

Why did you enroll in Integrated Science?

I decided to enroll because I have always loved science and took every science class offered in my high school. When I heard about the ISC sequence, it immediately seemed like the perfect thing for me, as I would finally get to learn about all of the different branches of science in an integrated manner, rather than as individual subjects. Even though I came into Princeton knowing that I wanted to concentrate in Molecular Biology and was pre-med, I wanted to maintain my interest in all of the sciences.

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